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You Know You’re a Hospital Kid When… Life with CRPS

Published on March 14, 2017 under Guest Blogger for RSDSA
By Guest Blogger, Melissa Lovitz This piece about being a hospital kid, especially one with CRPS/RSD, was originally posted on The Mighty. When you’re a spoonie you spend a lot of time in the hospital. About 10 years ago, I spent more than 10 cumulative weeks of my freshman year of high school either in the hospital or at doctors’ appointments. During my middle and high school years, my experiences with reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (or CRPS) landed me two six-week stays at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, two 10-day stays at Boston Children’s Hospital, and more doctors’ appointments than I can realistically count. When I was in high school, most of my inside jokes were with physicians who liked to dance every morning. I got…
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CRPS & GI – Frustrations From a Nurse’s Perspective

Published on December 13, 2016 under Guest Blogger for RSDSA
By Guest Blogger Beth Seickel, RN, BSN CRPS and GI issues may have some correlation. Nurse Beth details her perspective on this issue as both a person living with chronic pain and as a nurse. How can we prepare ourselves for hospitals? How can we educate the staff? As we educate the world around us, here is her story: So here goes! The frustration of living with CRPS spills over into everyday life we would all agree. Yet, speaking as a CRPS patient and Nurse, I have gained a unique point of view both as the health professional and now as the patient. Yet, my vulnerability as a patient was tested from an ER visit for acute abdominal pain and…
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A Measured Approach to Pain- Help People with Chronic Pain

Published on September 13, 2016 under Guest Blogger for RSDSA
By Guest Blogger Elisa Friedlander Written for the Huffington Post initially titled: A Measure Approach to Pain: Tools to Help Patients and Doctors "There’s one question I’ve been asked more than any other in my adult life. On a recent visit to the emergency room, I heard it once again. My pain was so intense I could hardly tolerate the standard intake procedures: getting my blood pressure taken and explaining why I was there was beyond me. When I told the admitting nurse about my symptoms, she followed up with those overly familiar words. “What’s your pain level on a scale of 1-10?” I couldn’t do it. It might have been the feeling of scalding hot knives piercing my body…
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